angela

If you've interviewed lately, you know the first step of a job interview is a phone screen. After you apply for a job, a recruiter from the company will reach out to you. They'll ask to setup a time to meet.

In the phone screen, the recruiter will ask predictable questions. They say, "Tell me about yourself." Then, they'll ask follow up questions. "Why are you interested in the job? Why are you looking for a job?" They may also ask how you heard about the job, or how much expertise you have in a certain area. And, they'll ask how much money you want.

It's pretty standard. The one question I have seen lately that is shocking however is this. At the very end of the interview, the recruiter will say, "After this call, can you email me a copy of your resume?" Read that again. "After this call, can you email me a copy of your resume?"

This seems like an odd question, right? What I'm getting at is this. Some recruiters are interviewing job applicants without having a copy of their resume. They aren't downloading it ahead of time from the application. They are going into an interview cold, without knowing anything about the candidate. They're asking random questions. They are completely and totally unprepared. And that is how they're making important hiring decisions for the company.

As a candidate, I suppose you may want to start off an interview by checking to see that the recruiter has a copy of your resume. However, this question really seems like it may introduce an odd dynamic to the conversation.

HR leaders, if you are reading this, please take note. This is a genuine problem. I've observed many examples of this lately. If you're a company, I know you want to hire the best people. And, you certainly don't want to waste a candidate's time. After all, candidates study for interviews. They memorize your job description. They scour the internet to learn about your company. They practice their answers to common interview questions. They prepare their own questions. And, often, they ask friends and family for help. This is a huge effort to go through for a recruiter to show up unprepared.

If you're looking for a job, I don't have a ton of great ideas for this problem. Honestly, the lack of accountability baffles me. And, companies are using these folks as the gate keepers. Sure, many recruiters are helpful. But, even one absent minded recruiter can really cause problems with an entire hiring process.

Companies, it's past time that we hold ourselves to the same standards that we hold candidates to. It's time to show up on time and prepared for our interviews. If we don't have something we need in order to participate in an interview, we should ask for that piece of information before the interview begins. It's step one.  

Angela Copeland, a career expert and founder of Copeland Coaching, can be reached at copelandcoaching.com.


 

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