robert

The chilly weather of late has caused the Time Traveler to reset the dial on the time machine past the cold midwinter and cool spring months to the balmy month of June, 1966.

Last week’s column focused on events exactly 100 years earlier. A century later, things were a tad bit more calm. But not for long.

A pair of lucky fishermen, Fritz Fisackerly and Rubel Bryant of Hernando, proudly displayed a string of freshly-caught crappie in a Times-Promoter photo that ran on June 10, 1966. Sadly, Mr. Fritz would pass away a few months later in November of that year.

It’s interesting to note that the “Fritz Store” at U.S. Hwy. 61 at the Mississippi-Tennessee state line in Walls was selling a tasty assortment of minnows, worms and crickets — tasty to crappie and bream, that is. Pretty sure, there were quite a good deal of “fish tales” being spun at the store counter.

But the talk in June of 1966 was of the one-man march, or “walk” as he referred to it by civil rights pioneer James Meredith from the state line to just south of Hernando where he was shot and wounded along U.S. Highway 51 on June 6, 1966. A would-be assassin stood in a stand of thick kudzu and a briar thicket just off the roadway after shouting out Meredith’s name in the effort to ambush him.

Meredith was shot several times and screamed out in pain on the roadway.  Those walking with Meredith scrambled for cover. Sirens began to wail and a hearse pulled up from a local funeral home, because DeSoto County had no ambulance service at that time.

Seeing the hearse roll up at the scene of the shooting prompted an Associated Press reporter to mistakenly phone in a report that Meredith had been killed.

Meredith would eventually recover from his wounds from a Memphis hospital and Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., would finish Meredith’s “March Against Fear” all the way to Jackson.

Fifty years to the day, Meredith returned to Hernando to commemorate that pivotal moment in his life and American history as a marker was dedicated near the spot where he was shot. A large crowd turned out to see him and greet him on his return visit.

That summer of 1966, boys from DeSoto County were being sent to fight in Vietnam.

It was noted that Private First Class Robert Glasper received a Purple Heart for his wounds in Vietnam. The son of Mr. and Mrs. Julios Glasper of Nesbit, Private Glasper was a grenadier in “A Troop,” 3rd Squadron, 4th Cavalry of the 255th Infantry Division. He attended Hernando Central High School.

That summer, “The Ten Commandments” with Charlton Heston and Yul Brynner, “one of the finest movies ever made in color,” was being promoted in the Times-Promoter, the predecessor to the DeSoto Times-Tribune.

Entertainment of another sort was planned for the “Second Gigantic Battle of the Bands as “The Us Group” battled “Larry and the Inmates,” in a county-wide musical contest.

Tombo’s Snack Bar opened its doors, with call-in orders-to-go, ranging from shrimp baskets to foot-long hot dogs on Hwy. 51 in Hernando.

Another local business opened. Frank Canada opened the Hernando Pharmacy that same year. A native of Coldwater, Frank and his bride Marilyn were married in June of that year.

The first bloom of DeSoto County’s cotton crop was reported to the Times-Promoter. The honor went to DeSoto County farmer Granville Barkley who sharecropped on the J.W. Pounders’ place near Lake Cormorant.

Also garnering honors that year was the Olive Branch High School football squad which led the Chickasaw Conference in football through the latter part of the season. The Eagles, as they were called then, would go on to win their first championship since the conference had been established, back in 1951.

Despite the tragedy, the hardship, the fighting in a far-away land, for a brief, still moment two lucky fishermen held up their prize catch for the camera and all posterity and smiled.

And one brave soul lived to tell his story for generations yet to be born.

The chilly weather of late has caused the Time Traveler to reset the dial on the time machine past the cold midwinter and cool spring months to the balmy month of June, 1966.

Last week’s column focused on events exactly 100 years earlier. A century later, things were a tad bit more calm. But not for long.

A pair of lucky fishermen, Fritz Fisackerly and Rubel Bryant of Hernando, proudly displayed a string of freshly-caught crappie in a Times-Promoter photo that ran on June 10, 1966. Sadly, Mr. Fritz would pass away a few months later in November of that year.

It’s interesting to note that the “Fritz Store” at U.S. Hwy. 61 at the Mississippi-Tennessee state line in Walls was selling a tasty assortment of minnows, worms and crickets — tasty to crappie and bream, that is. Pretty sure, there were quite a good deal of “fish tales” being spun at the store counter.

But the talk in June of 1966 was of the one-man march, or “walk” as he referred to it by civil rights pioneer James Meredith from the state line to just south of Hernando where he was shot and wounded along U.S. Highway 51 on June 6, 1966. A would-be assassin stood in a stand of thick kudzu and a briar thicket just off the roadway after shouting out Meredith’s name in the effort to ambush him.

Meredith was shot several times and screamed out in pain on the roadway.  Those walking with Meredith scrambled for cover. Sirens began to wail and a hearse pulled up from a local funeral home, because DeSoto County had no ambulance service at that time.

Seeing the hearse roll up at the scene of the shooting prompted an Associated Press reporter to mistakenly phone in a report that Meredith had been killed.

Meredith would eventually recover from his wounds from a Memphis hospital and Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., would finish Meredith’s “March Against Fear” all the way to Jackson.

Fifty years to the day, Meredith returned to Hernando to commemorate that pivotal moment in his life and American history as a marker was dedicated near the spot where he was shot. A large crowd turned out to see him and greet him on his return visit.

That summer of 1966, boys from DeSoto County were being sent to fight in Vietnam.

It was noted that Private First Class Robert Glasper received a Purple Heart for his wounds in Vietnam. The son of Mr. and Mrs. Julios Glasper of Nesbit, Private Glasper was a grenadier in “A Troop,” 3rd Squadron, 4th Cavalry of the 255th Infantry Division. He attended Hernando Central High School.

That summer, “The Ten Commandments” with Charlton Heston and Yul Brynner, “one of the finest movies ever made in color,” was being promoted in the Times-Promoter, the predecessor to the DeSoto Times-Tribune.

Entertainment of another sort was planned for the “Second Gigantic Battle of the Bands as “The Us Group” battled “Larry and the Inmates,” in a county-wide musical contest.

Tombo’s Snack Bar opened its doors, with call-in orders-to-go, ranging from shrimp baskets to foot-long hot dogs on Hwy. 51 in Hernando.

Another local business opened. Frank Canada opened the Hernando Pharmacy that same year. A native of Coldwater, Frank and his bride Marilyn were married in June of that year.

The first bloom of DeSoto County’s cotton crop was reported to the Times-Promoter. The honor went to DeSoto County farmer Granville Barkley who sharecropped on the J.W. Pounders’ place near Lake Cormorant.

Also garnering honors that year was the Olive Branch High School football squad which led the Chickasaw Conference in football through the latter part of the season. The Eagles, as they were called then, would go on to win their first championship since the conference had been established, back in 1951.

Despite the tragedy, the hardship, the fighting in a far-away land, for a brief, still moment two lucky fishermen held up their prize catch for the camera and all posterity and smiled.

And one brave soul lived to tell his story for generations yet to be born.

The chilly weather of late has caused the Time Traveler to reset the dial on the time machine past the cold midwinter and cool spring months to the balmy month of June, 1966.

Last week’s column focused on events exactly 100 years earlier. A century later, things were a tad bit more calm. But not for long.

A pair of lucky fishermen, Fritz Fisackerly and Rubel Bryant of Hernando, proudly displayed a string of freshly-caught crappie in a Times-Promoter photo that ran on June 10, 1966. Sadly, Mr. Fritz would pass away a few months later in November of that year.

It’s interesting to note that the “Fritz Store” at U.S. Hwy. 61 at the Mississippi-Tennessee state line in Walls was selling a tasty assortment of minnows, worms and crickets — tasty to crappie and bream, that is. Pretty sure, there were quite a good deal of “fish tales” being spun at the store counter.

But the talk in June of 1966 was of the one-man march, or “walk” as he referred to it by civil rights pioneer James Meredith from the state line to just south of Hernando where he was shot and wounded along U.S. Highway 51 on June 6, 1966. A would-be assassin stood in a stand of thick kudzu and a briar thicket just off the roadway after shouting out Meredith’s name in the effort to ambush him.

Meredith was shot several times and screamed out in pain on the roadway.  Those walking with Meredith scrambled for cover. Sirens began to wail and a hearse pulled up from a local funeral home, because DeSoto County had no ambulance service at that time.

Seeing the hearse roll up at the scene of the shooting prompted an Associated Press reporter to mistakenly phone in a report that Meredith had been killed.

Meredith would eventually recover from his wounds from a Memphis hospital and Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., would finish Meredith’s “March Against Fear” all the way to Jackson.

Fifty years to the day, Meredith returned to Hernando to commemorate that pivotal moment in his life and American history as a marker was dedicated near the spot where he was shot. A large crowd turned out to see him and greet him on his return visit.

That summer of 1966, boys from DeSoto County were being sent to fight in Vietnam.

It was noted that Private First Class Robert Glasper received a Purple Heart for his wounds in Vietnam. The son of Mr. and Mrs. Julios Glasper of Nesbit, Private Glasper was a grenadier in “A Troop,” 3rd Squadron, 4th Cavalry of the 255th Infantry Division. He attended Hernando Central High School.

That summer, “The Ten Commandments” with Charlton Heston and Yul Brynner, “one of the finest movies ever made in color,” was being promoted in the Times-Promoter, the predecessor to the DeSoto Times-Tribune.

Entertainment of another sort was planned for the “Second Gigantic Battle of the Bands as “The Us Group” battled “Larry and the Inmates,” in a county-wide musical contest.

Tombo’s Snack Bar opened its doors, with call-in orders-to-go, ranging from shrimp baskets to foot-long hot dogs on Hwy. 51 in Hernando.

Another local business opened. Frank Canada opened the Hernando Pharmacy that same year. A native of Coldwater, Frank and his bride Marilyn were married in June of that year.

The first bloom of DeSoto County’s cotton crop was reported to the Times-Promoter. The honor went to DeSoto County farmer Granville Barkley who sharecropped on the J.W. Pounders’ place near Lake Cormorant.

Also garnering honors that year was the Olive Branch High School football squad which led the Chickasaw Conference in football through the latter part of the season. The Eagles, as they were called then, would go on to win their first championship since the conference had been established, back in 1951.

Despite the tragedy, the hardship, the fighting in a far-away land, for a brief, still moment two lucky fishermen held up their prize catch for the camera and all posterity and smiled.

And one brave soul lived to tell his story for generations yet to be born.

ROBERT LEE LONG is Curator of the DeSoto County Museum in Hernando.

 

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